Limbo Magazine was founded during the coronavirus pandemic by Nick Chapin (publisher), Francesca Gavin (writer) and David Lane (of Lane & Associates). Created during the first national lockdown, the magazine aimed to support artists and creatives who faced unemployment.

The name “Limbo” reflects the times we were/are in as the founders acknowledged that as a community designers were struggling. Not being classed as a ‘key worker’ resulted in many losing work, being left with a financial burden.

The magazine successfully fulfilled its social responsibility by distributing all profits evenly between contributors. Acting as a kind of socialism, the magazine is produced and distributed by the design community but is not a political act, rather a necessity for those that are struggling (Limbo, 2020).

More-established designers (such as Vivienne Westwood and Tyler Mitchell) donated work rather than asking for a share of the profits. This allows less-established designers to use the magazine as a source of income as they were impacted the most by the pandemic.

Limbo Magazine was published as a retaliation against the rise of the digital age, particularly during lockdown as tactile things were limited due to potential transmission of Coronavirus. This retaliation has a sense of irony as the magazine was advertised online on websites such as It’s Nice That, the Creative Review and WePresent (Limbo Magazine’s publishing partner); it was also promoted on Instagram by the founders and some contributors. Thus using the digital age to aid promotion and contributing to digital dominance, rather than relying on word-of-mouth. However, this activism is inspiring for readers and designers, demonstrating how a community can unite in a time of turmoil to encourage collaboration and creativity.

Limbo Magazine was published as a retaliation against the rise of the digital age, particularly during lockdown as tactile things were limited due to potential transmission of Coronavirus. This retaliation has a sense of irony as the magazine was advertised online on websites such as It’s Nice That, the Creative Review and WePresent (Limbo Magazine’s publishing partner); it was also promoted on Instagram by the founders and some contributors. Thus using the digital age to aid promotion and contributing to digital dominance, rather than relying on word-of-mouth. However, this activism is inspiring for readers and designers, demonstrating how a community can unite in a time of turmoil to encourage collaboration and creativity.